Treanor Blog/News

Shoptalk: Sheet Metal Ornamentation

2014-10-10 Posted By: Patty Weaver

Shoptalk—deciphering architectural and historic preservation jargon one word at a time!

Term:
sheet metal ornamentation

Definition:
pressed or stamped sheet metal used to adorn and attract attention to a building; sheet metal ornamentation can be used on both the exterior and interior of a building

Examples:
Sheet metal ornamentation is predominantly found in late 19th-century and early 20th-century buildings as mass-production of architectural ornamentation became more prevalent. The ornamental products are manufactured from tin, zinc, copper and brass. Sheet metal ornamentation can be seen on a building’s exterior in the form of balusters, brackets, conductor heads, finials, window hoods and cornices.

The W.F. Norman Corporation, located in Nevada, Missouri, continues to produce sheet metal ornaments using the same production methods and original dies as were used over a century ago. Their catalog includes a product line of 140 ceiling components and over 1,300 ornaments. The W.F. Norman Corporation replicated a missing section of the Heaton Building’s cornice using original dies. Go to www.wfnorman.com for more information about this regional treasure, or better yet, call for a plant tour!

Here are just a few items our project manager, Dana Gould, saw on a tour of the W.F. Norman plant. On the left is a column capital form W.F. Norman uses to produce sheet metal column capitals and to the right is a sample of the company’s pressed metal moldings.
W.F. Norman

The Heaton Building in Norton, Kansas exhibits sheet metal window hoods, cornice line and pressed metal interior ceilings. The window hoods and cornice line can be seen in the image below. Original stamps from W.F. Norman were used to replicate the pressed metal cornices.
Heaton Building

A few more examples of sheet metal ornamentation can be seen on the Dugout, located at the Pioneer Ridge Development within a National Register historic district. On the left is a metal pedimented window hood, and on the right, is a metal keystone ornament.
Diagram of Joist Hangers

Kansas Statehouse Wins 2014 AIA Kansas Design Award

2014-10-03 Posted By: Patty Weaver

Treanor Architects’ Kansas Statehouse preservation and restoration project was recognized today at the AIA Kansas Design Awards with the 2014 Excellence in Renovation/Preservation Award.

Congratulations to the State of Kansas and all those who worked on the project!

Kansas Statehouse Exterior

Kansas Statehouse with the new public entrance, the Visitors Center, in the foreground.

Kansas Statehouse Rotunda

The restored rotunda at the Kansas Statehouse.

State Library of Kansas

The rehabilitated State Library of Kansas, located in the North Wing of the capitol.

RxCHITECTURE: Permits p.r.n.

2014-09-25 Posted By: Jac Samp

There is a moment right before the sledgehammer hits the walls when times stands still long enough to ask “do I need a permit for this?”

IBC Section 105 - conveniently labeled "Permits"IBC Section 105 - conveniently labeled "Permits"
Refurbishing? Make sure your repairs don't affect life safety!Refurbishing? Make sure your repairs don't affect life safety!

Shoptalk: Clay Tile Flat Arch

2014-09-19 Posted By: Patty Weaver

Shoptalk—deciphering architectural and historic preservation jargon one word at a time!

Term:
clay tile flat arch

Definition:
a floor framing system using hollow terra-cotta blocks; developed as a lighter, more economical alternative to the solid brick fireproof system commonly used in the 19th century

Examples:
It is common to find clay tile flat arch systems when restoring or renovating late 1800s and early 1900s buildings. One example of the clay tile flat arch system is the side method arch, shown in the figure below. The top figure, (a), shows the original version of the side method (a. I-beam, b. skewbacks, c. thin tile, d. tile blocks, e. wood nailing strips, f. concrete g. flooring) and the bottom figure, (b), shows a improved, stronger version of the method (a. skewbacks, b. lower flange, c. arch block, d. key block, e. wood nailing strips, f. concrete). (Source: A Treatise on Architecture and Building Construction Vol2: Masonry. Carpentry. Joinery., 1899)
Fig. 76 from Treatise on Architecture and Building Construction Vol. 2

Clay tile flat arch systems were found throughout the Kansas Statehouse during the restoration of the capitol. Below is clay tile flat arch found in the historic Supreme Court Chamber.
Diagram of Joist Hangers

This image shows the typical floor/ceiling construction of the Statehouse's North and South Wings.
Diagram of Joist Hangers

Shoptalk: Joist Hanger

2014-08-27 Posted By: Patty Weaver

Shoptalk—deciphering architectural and historic preservation jargon one word at a time!

Term:
joist hanger

Definition:
historically, a metal strap used to hang a joist from a larger structural beam, sometimes also referred to as a “stirrup iron hanger” due to its resemblance to a riding stirrup;  modern versions are engineered metal connections, usually galvanized steel, used to connect joists to steel beams or engineered wood beams

Examples:
This historic joist hanger came from the South Wing of the Kansas Statehouse.
Historic Joist Hanger from Kansas Statehouse

This diagram shows two ways that historic joist hangers were used in construction.(Source: Carpentry, Gilbert Townsend, American Technical Society 1951)
Diagram of Joist Hangers

Shoptalk: Archaic/Antiquated Structural System

2014-08-08 Posted By: Patty Weaver

Shoptalk—deciphering architectural and historic preservation jargon one word at a time!

Term:
archaic/antiquated structural system

Definition:
any structural system, often a historic proprietary product, no longer used in modern construction

Examples:
The Grand Masonic Lodge of Kansas was built in 1917 at the corner of 8th and Jackson Streets in Topeka, Kansas. The building is a concrete frame structure with an exterior stone cladding. The original structural drawings indicated “Floretyle” was to be used to span between the concrete beams. This was found to be a reference to the Truscon Floretyle System, produced by the Truscon Steel Company of Youngstown, Ohio. Designed as a form of reinforced concrete construction, the ribbed steel Floretyles were left in place once the concrete was poured. A metal lath system for plaster was integrated into the Floretyles during construction to create a flat ceiling beneath.

Not just a quaint misspelling, “Floretyle” in the original structural drawings for the Grand Masonic Lodge of Kansas warranted further research.
Floretyle in Grand Lodge

A diagram of the Floretyle system.(Source: Truscon Steel Company, Truscon Floretyle Construction, 1923)
Floretyle Diagram

A photo from the Truscon Floretyle pamphlet shows a typical installation in progress. (Source: Truscon Steel Company, Truscon Floretyle Construction, 1923)
Floretyle Installation

4th Annual Science Facility Symposium

2014-07-29 Posted By: Birgitta Reynolds
Article Link
Symposium attendees leaving for the KU Engineering High Bay tour. Symposium attendees leaving for the KU Engineering High Bay tour.
Ready for the trip to the construction zone.Ready for the trip to the construction zone.
Inside the high bay research area with a 40' tall and 36' wide strong wall used for testing of full scale systems and components. Inside the high bay research area with a 40' tall and 36' wide strong wall used for testing of full scale systems and components.
Session I: Technology in Education by Craig Park, FSMPS, Assoc. AIA, The Sextant GroupSession I: Technology in Education by Craig Park, FSMPS, Assoc. AIA, The Sextant Group
Session II: Sustainable Laboratory Design by Ed Kinsch & Rodney LaBelle, Kewaunee ScientificSession II: Sustainable Laboratory Design by Ed Kinsch & Rodney LaBelle, Kewaunee Scientific
Session III: Planning for New Academic Trends by Jack Black, AIA, LEED AP, Ayers Saint Gross.Session III: Planning for New Academic Trends by Jack Black, AIA, LEED AP, Ayers Saint Gross.

Celebrating Community & Each Other

2014-07-25 Posted By: Jac Samp
Jim Bogle, Vicki Kraft & Kathy Stone presented to our team, and we are committed to help!Jim Bogle, Vicki Kraft & Kathy Stone presented to our team, and we are committed to help!
Mark Muller describes material selection choices.Mark Muller describes material selection choices.
Dave Livingood walks the team through design options for Texas A&M.Dave Livingood walks the team through design options for Texas A&M.
Greg Kimball takes charge, pointing out details for his team.Greg Kimball takes charge, pointing out details for his team.
Sharon Schmitz shares special considerations about design for justice.Sharon Schmitz shares special considerations about design for justice.

How far will we go for preservation?

2014-06-27 Posted By: Patty Weaver

To another country! Vance Kelley, Treanor Preservation principal, and Julia Manglitz, Treanor Preservation project manager, recently travelled to Toronto, Canada to present a paper they co-authored at ASTM International’s Symposium on Masonry 2014.

While in Toronto they took in a few of the sights, including the CN Tower. The CN Tower is a 1,815.4 ft high concrete communications and observation tower in Downtown Toronto. It was completed in 1976, becoming the world's tallest free-standing structure and world's tallest tower at the time. It held both records for 34 years until the completion of Burj Khalifa and Canton Tower in 2010. It remains the tallest free-standing structure in the Western Hemisphere, a signature icon of Toronto's skyline, and a symbol of Canada, attracting more than two million international visitors annually.

In 1995, the CN Tower was declared one of the modern Seven Wonders of the World by the American Society of Civil Engineers. It also belongs to the World Federation of Great Towers, where it holds second-place ranking.

Photobombed! Vance and Julia were just trying to take a nice selfie when No Climbing Man jumps in the background. How rude.Photobombed! Vance and Julia were just trying to take a nice selfie when No Climbing Man jumps in the background. How rude.
No climbing allowed at the CN Tower.No climbing allowed at the CN Tower.
The CN Tower is a breathtaking 1,815.4 ft tall.The CN Tower is a breathtaking 1,815.4 ft tall.

Treanor Historic Preservation Staff to Make International Presentation

2014-06-12 Posted By: Patty Weaver

ASTM STP Mastheads

Julia Mathias Manglitz, AIA, and K. Vance Kelley, AIA, both of Treanor Architects, will present their technical paper, “Success and Failure in Applying ASTM Standards to the Evaluation and Rehabilitation of Historic Masonry Structures–A Case Study,” at ASTM International’s Symposium on Masonry 2014 in Toronto, Canada later this month.

The paper, co-authored with and Mark Hodges, PE, of Dudley Williams Associates, presents a case study to demonstrate the applicability of ASTM standards during the evaluation and rehabilitation of historic masonry. The case study focuses on the evaluation and repair of an existing structure, Fort Leavenworth’s Grant Hall (Building 52) Clock Tower, and the challenges of applying materials standards and specifications that were developed primarily for new construction.

Read More