Treanor Blog/News

Shoptalk: Archaic/Antiquated Structural System

2014-08-08 Posted By: Patty Weaver

Shoptalk—deciphering architectural and historic preservation jargon one word at a time!

Term:
archaic/antiquated structural system

Definition:
any structural system, often a historic proprietary product, no longer used in modern construction

Examples:
The Grand Masonic Lodge of Kansas was built in 1917 at the corner of 8th and Jackson Streets in Topeka, Kansas. The building is a concrete frame structure with an exterior stone cladding. The original structural drawings indicated “Floretyle” was to be used to span between the concrete beams. This was found to be a reference to the Truscon Floretyle System, produced by the Truscon Steel Company of Youngstown, Ohio. Designed as a form of reinforced concrete construction, the ribbed steel Floretyles were left in place once the concrete was poured. A metal lath system for plaster was integrated into the Floretyles during construction to create a flat ceiling beneath.

Not just a quaint misspelling, “Floretyle” in the original structural drawings for the Grand Masonic Lodge of Kansas warranted further research.
Floretyle in Grand Lodge

A diagram of the Floretyle system.(Source: Truscon Steel Company, Truscon Floretyle Construction, 1923)
Floretyle Diagram

A photo from the Truscon Floretyle pamphlet shows a typical installation in progress. (Source: Truscon Steel Company, Truscon Floretyle Construction, 1923)
Floretyle Installation

Shoptalk: Swept Standing Seam

2014-07-31 Posted By: Patty Weaver

Shoptalk—deciphering architectural and historic preservation jargon one word at a time!

Term:
swept standing seam

Definition:
used to finish a standing seam in sheet metal as the seam turns up a wall surface or to transition from one wall plane to another through an acute angle

Examples: See More Examples
Standing seam sheet metal has a long history of use as a roofing and wall cladding. Most commonly this cladding is applied over broad expanses with consistent slopes or over convex or concave curvatures. At inside corners, such as where a sloped surface meets a vertical surface, the seam can be swept or stood up. This is done by introducing a fold or pleat into the upturned edge at the change in direction. The extra thickness of metal at such locations requires hand work to turn the seam. This technique of sweeping the seam can be used to turn the standing seam up the wall and continue it, or it may be used to cleanly finish the panel at a reglet or other termination. It can also be used to sweep the seam into a soffit of overhang.

A sweep can be used to transition from standing seam to vertical upstand. (Source: Copper Roofing: A Practical Handbook, Copper Development Association, CDA Publication No. 57, 1959/1961)
CDA publication No. 57

4th Annual Science Facility Symposium

2014-07-29 Posted By: Birgitta Reynolds
Article Link
Symposium attendees leaving for the KU Engineering High Bay tour. Symposium attendees leaving for the KU Engineering High Bay tour.
Ready for the trip to the construction zone.Ready for the trip to the construction zone.
Inside the high bay research area with a 40' tall and 36' wide strong wall used for testing of full scale systems and components. Inside the high bay research area with a 40' tall and 36' wide strong wall used for testing of full scale systems and components.
Session I: Technology in Education by Craig Park, FSMPS, Assoc. AIA, The Sextant GroupSession I: Technology in Education by Craig Park, FSMPS, Assoc. AIA, The Sextant Group
Session II: Sustainable Laboratory Design by Ed Kinsch & Rodney LaBelle, Kewaunee ScientificSession II: Sustainable Laboratory Design by Ed Kinsch & Rodney LaBelle, Kewaunee Scientific
Session III: Planning for New Academic Trends by Jack Black, AIA, LEED AP, Ayers Saint Gross.Session III: Planning for New Academic Trends by Jack Black, AIA, LEED AP, Ayers Saint Gross.

Celebrating Community & Each Other

2014-07-25 Posted By: Jac Samp
Jim Bogle, Vicki Kraft & Kathy Stone presented to our team, and we are committed to help!Jim Bogle, Vicki Kraft & Kathy Stone presented to our team, and we are committed to help!
Mark Muller describes material selection choices.Mark Muller describes material selection choices.
Dave Livingood walks the team through design options for Texas A&M.Dave Livingood walks the team through design options for Texas A&M.
Greg Kimball takes charge, pointing out details for his team.Greg Kimball takes charge, pointing out details for his team.
Sharon Schmitz shares special considerations about design for justice.Sharon Schmitz shares special considerations about design for justice.

Shoptalk: Crimped Copper

2014-07-25 Posted By: Patty Weaver

Shoptalk—deciphering architectural and historic preservation jargon one word at a time!

Term:
crimped copper

Definition:
sheet copper that has been crimped such that the profile is corrugated

Examples: Read More
Historically, crimped copper was not just an aesthetic choice, the crimping also made the sheet copper stronger. This allowed a lighter material to be used and sometimes it was used without sheathing to support it from the backside. That was the case at Grant Hall. Replicating the historic crimp proved to be challenge, modern crimped copper doesn’t have the same profile or pattern repeat. Several custom fabricators were contacted to find a crimper that matched the historic copper; Heather & Little, Ltd was found to have a crimper that was still capable of producing the full size sheets need for the project. Renaissance Roofing formed and installed the crimped copper.

Comparison on historic and modern crimped copper.
Comparison of crimped copper

Shoptalk: Crenelated

2014-07-17 Posted By: Patty Weaver

Shoptalk—deciphering architectural and historic preservation jargon one word at a time!

Term:
crenelated / crenellatedr

Definition:
having a parapet wall in the form of a battlement with alternating openings (embrasures or crenels) and raised sections (merlons) located at the top of the wall or roof (Source: Bucher, Ward and Madrid, Christine. Dictionary of Building Preservation. Preservation Press, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1996.)

Examples:
Waldo Water Tower was completed in 1920 by the Kansas City Water Department as one of the largest reinforced concrete standpipes of its time. The water tower provided 1,000,000 gallons of fresh water to the surrounding neighborhood before it was decommissioned in 1957. Today, the tower stands as a community landmark in Tower Park, which is maintained by the Kansas City Parks and Recreation Department. The tower is currently undergoing a multi-year $750,000 restoration funded by the City of Kansas City Public Improvements Advisory Council (PIAC) and lead by Treanor Architects. The crenelated parapet walls are a key defining feature of the tower.

Waldo Water Tower historic elevation (Source: Kansas City Water Treatment Facility) marked with elements of a crenelated wall.
Waldo Water Tower Elevation

Shoptalk: Concealed Header

2014-07-09 Posted By: Patty Weaver

Shoptalk—deciphering architectural and historic preservation jargon one word at a time!

Term:
concealed header

Definition:
Historically, brick buildings were load bearing construction and the brick was both finish and structure and relied on multiple vertical layers or wythes of brick. The stacking or bonding of the brick in such structures usually exhibits the manner in which the layers of the wall tie together. In the modern era, brick has typically been used as a veneer and the bonding pattern generally is described as running bond. This visual difference is usually used to differentiate historic and modern use of brick. But there are a few historic buildings that exhibit running bond pattern for the exterior finish. Such buildings typically utilized concealed headers, sometimes called diagonal headers.

Examples: See More Examples
Historic detail: running bond with concealed header (Source: International Text Book Company, International Library of Technology 31D, 1923)
Running bond with concealed header

Shoptalk: Tooled Margin

2014-07-02 Posted By: Patty Weaver

Shoptalk—deciphering architectural and historic preservation jargon one word at a time!

Term:
tooled margin

Definition:
a masonry finish that gives the appearance of a band at the edge of a stone, typically one inch or more in width (Source: International Text Book Company, International Library of Technology 31D, 1923)

In traditional stone cutting margins, also called drafts, were used to layout the face of the stone and square it for installation in the wall. In softer stones, such as limestone, the margin is typically hand tooled with a chisel and mallet to create parallel fluted grooves in the stone. Modern machine cut tooling tends to be square in profile rather than fluted and lacks the slight irregularities of handwork that makes it pleasing to the eye.

Examples: See More Examples
The graphic below, Figure 28 from the International Library of Technology 31D, demonstrates a tooled margin.
Tooled Margin Figure

How far will we go for preservation?

2014-06-27 Posted By: Patty Weaver

To another country! Vance Kelley, Treanor Preservation principal, and Julia Manglitz, Treanor Preservation project manager, recently travelled to Toronto, Canada to present a paper they co-authored at ASTM International’s Symposium on Masonry 2014.

While in Toronto they took in a few of the sights, including the CN Tower. The CN Tower is a 1,815.4 ft high concrete communications and observation tower in Downtown Toronto. It was completed in 1976, becoming the world's tallest free-standing structure and world's tallest tower at the time. It held both records for 34 years until the completion of Burj Khalifa and Canton Tower in 2010. It remains the tallest free-standing structure in the Western Hemisphere, a signature icon of Toronto's skyline, and a symbol of Canada, attracting more than two million international visitors annually.

In 1995, the CN Tower was declared one of the modern Seven Wonders of the World by the American Society of Civil Engineers. It also belongs to the World Federation of Great Towers, where it holds second-place ranking.

Photobombed! Vance and Julia were just trying to take a nice selfie when No Climbing Man jumps in the background. How rude.Photobombed! Vance and Julia were just trying to take a nice selfie when No Climbing Man jumps in the background. How rude.
No climbing allowed at the CN Tower.No climbing allowed at the CN Tower.
The CN Tower is a breathtaking 1,815.4 ft tall.The CN Tower is a breathtaking 1,815.4 ft tall.

Shoptalk: Compatible Addition

2014-06-27 Posted By: Patty Weaver

Shoptalk—deciphering architectural and historic preservation jargon one word at a time!

Term:
compatible addition

Definition:
building addition that is visually distinguishable from the historic building yet respects the original architecture in design, scale and materials; addition that resembles the historic without duplicating the original design (Source: National Park Service, Preservation Briefs, #14 New Exterior Additions to Historic Buildings: Preservation Concerns)

Examples: See More Examples

Gwynn Hall’s, University of MissouriColumbia, southwest entrance tower addition on the building's rear elevation is compatible with the historic building’s massing, size and scale. The addition was differentiated from the historic gothic-style building through modern design—smooth stone instead of rough cut and glass elements—yet remained compatible with the use of appropriate materials and design elements—white limestone and narrow windows.
Gwynn Hall Southwest Entrance Tower Addition